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Access to safe, clean water for Refugees in  Bangladesh camps.

“In some camps there are latrines in front of their dwellings upon the mazes of long bamboo sheds. They are choked with the blackest rancid bubbly mixture of everything nasty that you can possibly imagine from excrement to dead animals. Mosquitoes hovering over their putrid breeding ground just inches from where thousands of people are laying on the mud floors of their huts. In the midst of the hot season, the gunk in the latrines thicken into a bog like mixture.- Andrew Day 

Unlike the Kutapalong Registered camp where the main source of water is ground water, with tube wells (one functioning tube well to 107 families on average), Nayapara camp, which is in Teknaf sub district beside the river Naf, groundwater is not available due to hydrological constrains.

In order to provide water in the Nayapara camp, an artificial reservoir was constructed within the boundary of the camp. Drinking water is supplied through a pipe line network and during the dry season, water is trucked in to the camp.


Nayapara. Photos by Andrew Day 

The operating time of the water taps is 2 hours per day, though it is of one cause of discrepancy. The families report that they only manage to collect 3 to 4 containers per family per day, 6 to 8 liters. For an average family of 6 or more this ration is hardly enough and well below the 15 to 20 liters recommended.

Shamlapur 


Leda Unregistered Camp

Nayapara Registered Camp


The water they are getting to drink and to cook with, depending on where you are will come from a dirty ravine, shallow tube wells or pumped from reservoirs. The quality of water is terrible. Most of the water sources begin to dry up at the end of the hot season, before the rain comes, making supply scarce.

Men can bathe with a bucket standing by a tube well, or some will go to the murky brown water that has collected in an ablution pond at some of the larger mosques. The women can’t do so as easily without harassment.

In these densely populated areas, many women can only hope for a small water pail to wash themselves inside their huts.
The rain will finally come during the monsoon season. The heavy downpours will cause the latrines to flood over and the hellish contents therein flows into their sleeping quarters and saturates all their possessions. Their clothes, their cooking pot, whatever that has not been taken away by the current of flood water, which when it gets so bad could rise up to chest high of this bacteria laden runoff.” – Andrew Day


In between the refugee camps, local thugs rule the areas and harass the Refugees living there. This Refugee woman from Leda Camp showing us the crushed water jugs – a harassment against the refugees preventing them from collecting water from the stream.

“It is dangerous in the forest where we go to collect wood or dry leaves, there are robbers, or villagers or forest ranger demand money from us. They take our tools and beat us until we pay. But we don’t have money to pay”. – Refugee, Leda Camp. 


Many have told stories of beatings from thugs and police for something as basic as collecting water from a nearby stream. Women folk tells of how they are stopped, verbally abused and raped if they are intercepted by these men. These incidents doesn’t get reported to the authorities as their statuses of being unregistered deem them illegal and unprotected by any laws.

The access to clean and safe water everywhere is a problem. Very few water sources are ever tested but with the shallow wells and reservoirs so overlapped with sewage, it is inevitable that eating and drinking will make them sick.

These unnecessary circumstances are breeding grounds for infections and typhoid is a reoccurring condition or rather a perpetual one, to the point where fevers and vomiting are not to be taken as cause for alarm because they are so common. A common combination is typhoid with anemia and most likely a bacterial skin disease.

Skin diseases are common and spreads easily in the communities due to the unhygienic living conditions, poor sanitation and polluted water. photo by Andrew Day 

Living is impossible when people are eating and drinking traces of faeces daily. That’s if they have anything to eat at all.

Many unregistered Rohingya live in unofficial refugee settlements, where malnutrition rampant. In one makeshift camp, the global acute malnutrition rate is at 30%, double of emergency threshold.

But despite of this, the government has denied permits for aid agencies to assist unregistered refugees, stating  that medical, food, drinking water and training facilities run by the charities were encourgaing an influx of Rohingya to the country.

Borrowing, lending, trading, selling and buying food are common coping mechanisms among the refugees to compensate for the food deficit. Those who are registered also share their food rations with those who are not. There have also been reported incidences of forced sale of food rations to local villagers which have been instigated and aided by camp personnel, the Mahjees and local thugs.

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“I have to borrow sometimes up to five kilograms of food a week to feed my family.” Nayapara refugee, family of 14.


The dry season and monsoon season each year poses a huge risk to the people living in these areas. 


Much help is needed in building safe access to clean water and to build lavatories for the communities. 



According to UNHCR the recent influx of Rohingya refugees from Myanmar, saw 70,000 people cross over to Bangladesh since October 2016. From the 1990s, the country has had a huge number of refugees who fled the persecution and violence against them. The number of refugees in Bangladesh is reported to be almost 1 Million in total, which means only 10% of the refugees receive aid in the UN registered camps. The UN is currently struggling with a $10Million budget gap.

Adding to the already huge number of refugee in the country, these families are currently living in makeshift tents around the border areas. Some 2000 families are reported to be hiding in the forests.


With the monsoon season expected in 2 months time and almost right in the middle of the month of Ramadan, these families will have to face an even more dire situation on top of lack of food and medical care.

• UNHCR seeks equal treatment for all Rohingya in Bangladesh

http://www.unhcr.org/news/latest/2017/3/58cfac434/unhcr-seeks-equal-treatment-rohingya-bangladesh.html

• UNHCR Bangladesh Report http://reporting.unhcr.org/node/2539#_ga=1.252538689.972090440.1490090221

Liz Mys and Andrew Day

Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh

Twitter: @theangelwinks

@andrew_day1982

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Helping from the heart 

I sit thousands of miles away now as I write this entry today. It has been one and a half years ago when we first started the journey to do the work and being away from there this time has been quite a grueling experience.

The last few weeks there in Bangladesh were intense. There were projects still on going and the works to oversee and coordinate, medical support for the rural schools, as well as the big distributions of meal packages and Aid to the thousands in the villages, both locals and Refugees.

It seems hard to believe that, a miracle actually, that in the one year we were there, we managed to  facilitate and help  – with support from the organization and also our own crowdfunding, support from friends and people online and support from the several organizations where we facilitated their projects for them. It was tangly and difficult for most of the coordination especially in areas where getting help in has to be done under the radar as well as ensuring safety of all the people who are helping us on the ground.

It’s hard to wrap our own heads around it, even as we look through the many many photos we took while we were there. It’s almost a surreal feeling. We were just two people who wanted to help make some kind of difference and the support we received from friends and strangers alike has been really heartwarming and truly awesome.

Building schools, provided thousands and thousands of meals, blankets, clothes, books, wells, toilets,  medical care, medical support, much needed clean water, electricity with solar panels…I call it God’s mercy and blessings and it’s amazing.

We left the place where so many people depended on us…5 schools, 5 orphanages, so many families, the street kids, and the hundreds into thousands in the  villages. 

The close friends we made, the children on the streets who come out from their shacks, whose faces light up to the brightest smile when we walk with them, who are so much better and don’t beg from us now but just happy to spend a 10 minute walk to the beach with us. I feel happy when I see they can just be and enjoy themselves as kids, trying to converse in the few English words they learnt from us just happy hanging out instead of chasing someone to beg for money. 

The time away hasn’t been easy. The people still need help and still contacting and messaging … “No rice, no money”, “my uncle, my baby is very sick”. It’s hard  and without us there we find it difficult  to channel any funds, aid and support for the rural villages, schools, orphanages and especially the refugee community. 

Being on the other side of things and talking about it hasn’t been easy or hard. Some people get it and some don’t. Some say “ahh too bad you don’t get paid for the work”. Some can really appreciate the work and wish they can do it too and some don’t want to try to know. You get mixed opinions. 

I think some misconception is we “aid workers” just enjoy time sitting on the beach with kids and taking selfies and travel with organization paying for us. Not work. 

It’s hard, to make people see and understand, especially in a world where success is measured by money and materialistic things for people to understand what it is. Even typing this entry I’m silently kicking myself thinking why should I even bother to explain….

We do not sit and smile. Behind the photos and selfies you see, there’s countless hours of typing proposals, emails, amidst flactuating electricity or sometimes biting our nails praying for the power which has been out for 6 hours to come back on as our battery packs drained out so that we can send out a message to try get emergency funding for a community starving, a very sick kid, an outbreak of diseases in 2 schools or unregistered camp, traveling in a 3 wheeler for sometimes a 60km/one way, on a bumpy, bone jarring 4 hour journey  in the pouring rain, taking pictures. collecting data and information, not sleeping, typing to people in different time zones to try get funding to feed or medicate or clothe or give help, give water. 

The stress level hits high as we Frantically try to get money to the families for Medicine or coordinating late at night  to rush a person from camp to hospital 2 hours away, a child struggling to breathe from pneumonia, managing and trying to go around bloody red tape. We hardly eat, on most days we eat only once a day and sick with worry about whether the person will get fed or treated in time before it’s too late. You see the suffering and knowing that you can help.. you cannot turn a blind eye.

It’s quite disheartening when people dismiss and brush the efforts and hard work  or the people and communities we help aside.”ehh .. what about this, what about that”.  To a point, I feel bad for them, I guess it’s difficult for them to see beyond and the bigger picture. With the work and the thousands of kids and families it’s a matter of survival, life and death. We don’t live in a comfortable detached bubble. we stare at thousands living in severe poverty not knowing if they are going to make it. I’m sad  and think of the ones who do live in a tiny bubble, who sit in comfortable homes and pass judgments. It’s just quite sad. 

The days you see, touch or sit with a person who’s eyes sunken and ribs sticking out or a bloated belly and knowing that you can get him help, when you get to a shack and see a child emancipated and shaking because of fever with bleeding and weeping blisters and rush him to the hospital because his family is too poor to feed or get him help. When you put children, girls and boys in schools, build schools in rural areas in hope you give them an opportunity and education for their future where it’s hand to mouth existence for their families, when you get to facilitate help to buy food for a family or thousands of families. The stress the worry the amount of work and effort and also the hope they have and asking you to please help them. My God it takes a lot out of you. 

We post pictures of smiles of children, of hope and laughter it doesn’t mean it all is. The hard work that pays off in giving and sharing that’s what we share as much as possible in our pictures. We share it with the many friends and online contacts and the organizations that helped make that happen. …. It’s definitely work and it’s from the heart, trying to make a difference in the lives of people who have nothing. At the very least I hope, what we earn in return is heaven’s tokens, if nothing else. 

~Liz ❤️

Rohingya – End the Ethnic Cleansing 

It seems the hysteria is dying down; to the circle of the usual activists and those who fight relentlessly to get as much attention to the cause and to the few news and organizations who are still covering the story. But it’s the same cycle, attention and news for a while and everyone else carries on till some other big story hits. 
The “boat people” which has been termly coined with the latest breaking story, uncovered massive exploitation ring, some known for a while and some newly “discovered” information of torture, ransom and detention.

As much as sensationalism goes, not much has changed in regards to a great breakthrough and hope for the Rohingya. Someone once wrote “sadly the Rohingya people’s sufferings do not appear to be deemed newsworthy by world media”. ..and pretty much true.

We have heard from the Dalai Lama, the respected Desmond TuTu and Barrack Obama the President of the United States who made a statement of a few words, referring to the plight and matter as “a great test for the democracy of future” and “to take very seriously this issue of how the Rohingya are treated”. 

World heads and world leaders and famous people championing the plight of the Rohingya; but what has it actually accomplished?

For now the heat is on the trafficking ring, so that will stop for a bit. But sadly in time, many more will be pushed to take that risk again for a better chance at life and a new cycle will start. 

We have help given to the ones who have made land in Indonesia and some in Malaysia. Help with money and aid to house them and care for them after the harrowing ordeal at sea. Many organizations and individuals have gone there- don’t get me wrong, it’s a fantastic gesture to see the level of kindness and love, humanity with people from all over coming to help. It’s beautiful and it is heartwarming. 

Remember the words by Chinua Achebe “While we do our good works let us not forget that the real solution lies in a world in which charity will have become unnecessary.”? Not to devalue the humanity and humanitarian gesture and not saying to remove charity at all, because God knows we the people of the world with its current global condition, charity will continue and it kinda has to. 

It’s looking at a solution. A durable shot at changing the situation and maybe a bit of the world. 

Just look at where we are at now.

Paranoia. The whole world is gripped with it. Fear. Oh my god yeah. 

Hatred. Racism. 

Greed. Phisshh…. wheels turning to explore and exploit the already down and out, making money out of the misery of others.  

For the Rohingya, the conditions don’t exist for them to go back where they came from. The Burmese government stripped the Rohingya of the right to hold temporary identification cards, but did not guarantee the full rights of a citizen. So what is that really? Feels like a living nightmare that your house, although it’s yours but you’re not allowed to have any rights, someone else gets to dictate what and how you get to live and you will probably get killed or your family members, while all you can do is you just watch it happen. 

A process of “ethnic cleansing and genocide”, let that sink in your perspective for a bit. 

It’s no use to use the plaster effect, Band-Aid actions if you will, it doesn’t help the root of all the happenings we are witnessing. 

Temporary measures would not be durable nor good for the people. Many more Rohingya children will be born “Stateless” in the countries who have been kind to take them in and many many more will be born in the camps. Many more will go to the seas again. No rights and dignity as a world citizen, and at the mercy of the host country still dictating what can be allowed to be provided to the Refugees. 

Boycott Burma. The nations of ASEAN, God bless them, whatever gestures, pressured or otherwise, that they have given. It puts a lot of stress on their own governments to take in the people but still not solving the stateless position of the Rohingya. Another child would grow up without rights to proper education, another mother would be giving birth to a child whose future of his life and roots will be soon be erased if this continues and just living on a hope or dream to be elevated instead of persecuted. 

Boycott Burma, with trade and economic sanctions. The leaders of ASEAN countries should stop being an indirect accomplice to the Ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya. Full rights to return home and all the rights as a citizen of Myanmar must be demanded with no compromise till that is achieved, instead of complaining, instead of just fixing up meetings and more exchanges of diplomatic words. 

I am not of a political expert or anything like that but maybe just enough to dream of a better way because I am sick of watching the way the people have to live, merely existing sometimes. Maybe cordon off land on Myanmar soil with Peacekeeping force mending and looking out for angry mobs targeting the Rohingya for a change. And let the people build back their lives in a system, working towards coexistence with the country, I don’t know how. But living and running in fear, in severe lack of rights, no freedom and unknown, bleak future is not what they or we want in any spot in our lives or country. 

The POTUS has spoken and says to “take very seriously this issue of how the Rohingya are treated”. How about doing something to stop the persecution, stop the Genocide. 

So can we do it? Countless petitions has been signed, many more demonstration and protests and talks have been done. What does it take for us, you, me, we, them, and the other leaders to put a stop on a 21st century genocide? 

If Justice stands for something then the Rohingya deserves to live on the land their past generations have lived on, if humanity is preached and worshipped by the majority people there, then brotherhood should be respected and restored. If peace is possible let it be what we wish for others too. 

A dream maybe, a human need to belong and live in peace, not pieces, co existing well, because it is possible. 

I remember a young Rohingya man asked me once when I visited the camp last year, most heartbreaking question I couldn’t find words to answer while I stood & listened to them is this 

“Why? (the injustice) ..We have dreams too” #Rohingya 
~Liz MYS ❤️
   
 

The Rohingyas Plight – Adrift and Abandoned. 

News everywhere is reporting the story of the numerous boats full of people, men, women and children adrift and abandoned at seas near Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia and Bangladesh. 

In one of our tweets from an interview we did few months ago where thousands of unregistered refugees were evicted and had their homes torn down, they describe how helpless they are and at the mercy of the authorities. 

When asked what should we do, where would we go the police told them,”Why don’t you go to the sea, you can die there”. Appalling. Seems that’s exactly what is happening now out on those waters. 

The police here claimed that they were just doing what the authorities ordered, to make way for a tourist line on the Marina way. God knows what tourist strip this was going to be, as we looked at the area with piles of torn-down wood, sheets and bamboo around the area, dozens and dozens of children and babies having to live in the cramp make shift tents while others try to rebuild their huts on whichever smaller plots of land they could build back their huts on. 

There are many stories, of human trafficking, girls driven to brothels and pimps, drug mules by locals who would use them to traffic drugs and abandon them if they get caught, just too many horrors in the refugees struggle to live a decent life, and how many thousands are taken advantage of. 

I look at the stories and the photos of the current situation with the boats and I think to myself, if I was on that boat, or if my family was on there, I would want someone, anyone, to help me, as would you I’m sure. 

I cannot even begin to imagine the desperation on board the boats, men, women and children fleeing a persecuted life in hope of a bit of mercy, a bit of chance to escape and wanting a better life than being oppressed and hunted and tortured, marginalized in their very own country. 

I cannot bear to see the pictures for once. I can already picture in my head the hunger, the fear in each and every one of them. 

As naive as it may sound -or not, I hope we can get to them fast. Some aid has been dropped to some of the boats, a few has jumped off and drowned, today’s story is how some of those on board got killed, fighting to get food from the aid given. Aid boats under fire for trying to reach them too.  Just beyond any words, oh humanity. 

Being denied landfall, adrift and abandoned. Days turned into weeks, a frightening nightmare no doubt. 

I hope we can put our heads together and come up with a relief and solution for these people. 

Like I said, if that was me on board, I would want someone to help. Wouldn’t you? IA 

~Liz ❤️

Main Featured photo: by Andrew Day Photography and watermarked photos © Copyrighted 

     

  

  

   

    

                     

           

The Pursuit of Happiness 

Many days I sit down with the thoughts in my head and the shoulders ache from the emotions of the day. The scope of the despair is immense. Most days you feel the joy of the journey and sometimes you feel like you could’ve done better. Some days you can get to be the person who could help and sometimes you are the person who needs help. 
The people are just so many and your hands are tied. The fact that you have what it is to give to make it all somewhat better but feel like you fall short in your energy & resources.
You ponder most nights sitting alone at all that’s missing, needed and much more. You see the people, the process and the problem & you try to think of many scenarios & ways to make it, pulling out the stops to make the best out of the situation for them. Knowing like the words said to me last night, “The one who holds the glue together, is always the least recognized  one” something like that…. I try to think Starfish starfish starfish … (Starfish Story) 

In the world, all the time there’s something, someone, somewhere and when you get to see and to be able to get to do, be it just being there or offer help its a privilege. 

The fact is that we can get wholly intoxicated by the high or drunk low when the needs cannot be met. How do you strike a balance between that? 

To me it is too important for us to have the balance… to be able to feel the Grief yet stay strong n stand up to fight & sometimes it is good to remember to just be yourself, to be able to detach from all that and be you and those closest because that is important too. Balance, if you have that, then you’ve found the philosophers stone, a gem of wisdom. Yet many of us struggle and haven’t got to that stage yet… 

I share one of my favorite poems by Alexander Pope (not religious affiliated, so don’t pick on the use of the words Lord, God, Father)…. I’ve posted it few times just like the Starfish Story: I find it soothing … 

Peace Everyone 

Love 

Liz❤️

The Universal Prayer

BY ALEXANDER POPE

Father of all! in every age, 
    In every clime adored, 
By saint, by savage, and by sage, 
    Jehovah, Jove, or Lord! 


Thou Great First Cause, least understood: 
    Who all my sense confined 
To know but this—that thou art good, 
    And that myself am blind: 


Yet gave me, in this dark estate, 
    To see the good from ill; 
And binding Nature fast in fate, 
    Left free the human will. 


What conscience dictates to be done, 
    Or warns me not to do, 
This, teach me more than Hell to shun, 
    That, more than Heaven pursue. 


What blessings thy free bounty gives, 
    Let me not cast away; 
For God is paid when man receives, 
    To enjoy is to obey. 


Yet not to earth’s contracted span, 
    Thy goodness let me bound, 
Or think thee Lord alone of man, 
    When thousand worlds are round: 


Let not this weak, unknowing hand 
    Presume thy bolts to throw, 
And deal damnation round the land, 
    On each I judge thy foe. 


If I am right, thy grace impart, 
    Still in the right to stay; 
If I am wrong, oh teach my heart 
    To find a better way. 


Save me alike from foolish pride, 
    Or impious discontent, 
At aught thy wisdom has denied, 
    Or aught thy goodness lent. 


Teach me to feel another’s woe, 
    To hide the fault I see; 
That mercy I to others show, 
    That mercy show to me. 


Mean though I am, not wholly so 
    Since quickened by thy breath; 
Oh lead me wheresoe’er I go, 
    Through this day’s life or death. 


This day, be bread and peace my lot: 
    All else beneath the sun, 
Thou know’st if best bestowed or not, 
    And let thy will be done. 


To thee, whose temple is all space, 
    Whose altar, earth, sea, skies! 
One chorus let all being raise! 
    All Nature’s incense rise!

Our travels, People and Places

As always there never has been a dull moment with the time we spent on our travels. Heart stopping moments aplenty, the thousands of faces we see and the people we meet and all the smiles shared. These experiences for us is something we would remember and cherish for a long time to come.

Mother Teresa said these once: (a great woman with a big heart and one of the great ones who is my inspiration a lot of times)

-“Not all of us can do great things. But we can do small things with great love.”
― Mother Teresa

““Do not think that love in order to be genuine has to be extraordinary. What we need is to love without getting tired. Be faithful in small things because it is in them that your strength lies.”
― Mother Teresa

Our travels almost every time brings us the unexpected. We just don’t know what we will see or who will be our teacher the next moment. It’s been a deep learning journey for us both.

With each and every person we meet its like peeling layers… (Andrew would quote Shrek at this point 🙂
The little girl on the side road with her grin, the families who invite us into their homes even though they have nothing, the care from these people are genuine. Person to person. (Yes there are some people who would be the flip side but let’s not go there hey)

It’s comforting to know and share this incredible bond in a crazy, mad world we live in. The need to balance and share and give back and helping one another, be it from us or the hundreds who have heard & read our stories we tell or the pictures we shared.

With what we do on our experience and encounters we try as much as possible to tell their story. A story that the world can connect to and with that reach back. A story that gives that little unknown kid a chance, the orphans who pretty much having to survive at the mercy of a hand to mouth existence, relying on a helping hand to get through or not;
and numerous other little ones who are depended on by their families to bring in whatever little income in help for the family on a day-to-day basis.

We try to listen, we do take lots of pictures of everything, sometimes risking ourselves, feeling we need to tell their story to the world, the little unknown ones whom nobody knows of and what they have to go through.

Poverty here is such a huge mess of a problem. People get all-in-all worked through just to get a $1 a day means to survive.
The orphanages rely so much on people’s mercy to feed the kids on a $1:50 per child budget a day, thereabouts.

Here we are pretty much known as the “Hello, How are you”s I know a little girl who asks her father, “Papi can I go to How are you house?” Aww “How are you” coz that’s what I ask every person who approach us.
And it has caught on… :)) People we walk past or children from way in the corner, when they see us they call out “Helllooooo!!! How are youuu?” and smiles and waves and we wave back. It’s just a simple but amazingly beautiful connection.

“Every time you smile at someone, it is an action of love, a gift to that person, a beautiful thing.”
― Mother Teresa

It’s been a hard few weeks (solid busy & intense) but we keep doing what we can I guess… & keep sharing it out and it’s just a unique experience for us both.

Well……
I’m going to sleep now because it’s way past 2am in the morning but I leave you with this. …

“Life is an opportunity, benefit from it.
Life is beauty, admire it.
Life is a dream, realize it.
Life is a challenge, meet it.
Life is a duty, complete it.
Life is a game, play it.
Life is a promise, fulfill it.
Life is sorrow, overcome it.
Life is a song, sing it.
Life is a struggle, accept it.
Life is a tragedy, confront it.
Life is an adventure, dare it.
Life is luck, make it.
Life is too precious, do not destroy it.
Life is life, fight for it.” 
― Mother Teresa

Peace, Hope and so much love

Liz ❤️

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The Displaced People

Thousands of Refugees were evicted from their makeshift camps on Wednesday after the police here were ordered to clear and tear down their houses in the area, which is approximately 60 kilometers from Cox’s Bazar, to make way for tourism along the new Marine Drive Road.

The unregistered Refugee communities there have
been living in that area since the 1990s, after fleeing the ethnic persecution in their own country, Myanmar.

The area looked like a scene after a cyclone had wiped parts of the areas.
Families were seen with the portion of their belongings they picked from the piles of scraps from what was their home.
Mothers with the young children, staring bleakly at their torn down homes, trying to collect their small possession of some plastic sheets and sticks, some pots. The men folk working to put the huts back together for their families to have at least a cover above their heads to live in.

It’s a big blow to an already struggling group of people who have very little to make ends meet, a daily hand-to-mouth existence in this largely fishing community. Life is hard for them.

The fact that they fled and then got settled somewhat in another country, only to be at the mercy of the existing laws that do not do much for them either. The unregistered refugees do not receive much of the aid (if any) like the people in the camp who are helped with food rations and some medical support from UN & NGOs. They, pretty much like all the people in and around here have to keep struggling and keep strong to try and make it in life.

The push for better treatment and acceptance, of better accommodate , better support them is an ongoing struggle, there are thousands of people and much aid and other issues to try to work through.

Help in means of food aid, better education for the children and work skills training for the adults would be a good way to try to reach out.

Let’s try.

Liz❤️
Email: ttravelers2@gmail.com
Photos by Andrew #andrewdayphotography

#Refugeestruggles #Rohingya #Refugees #AppealForHelp #Hope

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